Wednesday, 7 February 2018

Echo Sugarloaf

Wednesday 7th February 2018

Randalls Bay and Huon River from summit Echo Sugarloaf
Just a short walk today mainly to check out the new track to Echo Sugarloaf which was opened last week. I had previously walked Echo Sugarloaf but used a different route - see Cray Point walk. The new track has been constructed by the Friends of Randalls Bay Coast Care in conjunction with National Parks, I think. They have done an excellent job on the track.
As the new track is only 2.2 kms. one way I decided to start at Mickeys Beach and throw in a few variations to extend the walk. I drove in and parked at Mickeys Beach and headed straight down to the beach. The weather was great with no wind and it was very pleasant on the beach by myself.

Mickeys Beach

Mickeys Beach
At the eastern end of the beach I scrambled up the cliffs to the track and walked around to the point at Randalls Bay.

Randalls Bay

Looking down the Channel

At the point Randalls Bay
From there I kept going to Randalls Bay beach and walked the length of it before exiting to the road.

Randalls Bay

Randalls Bay

Randalls Bay
The new track starts off Williams Street at the same location that provides access to the State Reserve. The track climbed steadily with an elevation gain of only 200 metres to the trig point at the summit. It was pleasant walking with nice open bush and a wetland/pond was passed along the way with a viewing platform, but no birds were evident.







Walking along the ridge of Echo Sugarloaf

Port Cygnet from summit
Once the trig marker is reached that is the track end, but they are hoping to continue it on when funds become available to make a loop walk. This would not be too difficult as I have walked down from the ridge to the track start previously. There are some tapes that continue further along the ridge which is possibly the suggested route, but I just kept walking in a southerly direction, mostly following the tapes, and when they ended I just kept going down through the scrub to the coast. The scrub was not too bad and it did not take too long to get there. I had a bit of a scramble down to the beach and walked west back to Randalls Bay. If coming this way make sure the tide is out otherwise it would be a bash through the scrub above the beach.

Garden Island

Heading west along the shore

Nice little isolated beach
There was a mixture of beach and rock hopping and once I reached the point on the eastern end of Randalls Bay, there was a bit of wadding in waist high water to get to the point. I could have scrambled up and over but it looked quite steep and the water was cool and refreshing.

Garden Island

The point where I had to wade

Garden Island Bay

At the eastern point

At the eastern point
Once back on dry land I climb up the track that runs along the top of the cliffs and walked back to Randalls Bay and eventually to the car. The day was still exceptionally pleasant.

Little beach on the way back to Mickeys Beach
This was a very enjoyable short walk in delightful weather. If just doing the Echo Sugarloaf track and returning the same way, it is 4.4 kms. and expect to take about 1'40".
Today's walk.
Distance: 8.8 kms.
Time 3'16"
Ascent: 350 metres
Click here for GPX file.




Friday, 2 February 2018

Deep Glen Bay

Thursday 1st February 2018

Deep Glen Bay
This walk has some significance as Deep Glen Bay is where most of the crew of the Blythe Star came ashore in a life raft after their ship sank near South West Cape in 1973. Three of the crew managed to climb out from the bay and basically rescued themselves. This was no mean feat as the country is quite steep and would have been harrowing ordeal for these men. Just Google Blythe Star for more info.
I had previously checked out where the descent to the bay commenced on a previous walk to Macgregor Peak so I had some idea of where I was going. I parked at the car park for Macgregor Peak and set off along Macgregor Road which has become impassible to vehicles because of large downed trees across it.

Macgregor Road
After about 2.0 kms. I turned right into Schofields Road and followed this to Deep Glen Creek where the descent commenced.

Schofields Road

Hut beside the road

Inside hut

Further along Schofields Road
The track down to Deep Glen Bay was flagged all the way, but it would not really matter if it wasn't, as it basically followed Deep Glen Creek all the way down, sometimes in the creek, and other times on either side of the creek. It was reasonably steep and the rocks in the creek further down were wet and slippery. The rain forest was very nice with lots of moss and ferns.

Deep Glen Creek

Deep Glen Creek
Deep Glen Creek
I eventually arrived at the bay. There is no beach to speak of, only rocks, but it was quite beautiful. It is only a tiny bay, about 100 metres across at the shoreline, and very isolated. I spent some time taking in the scenery.









I was not particularly looking forward to the climb out but it had to be done. There was no other way out, except by boat, and that would have been nice, as it was fairly calm. The ascent was a bit of a grind and when I was about two thirds up, I inadvertently started following another set of tapes. They finally petered out, or I missed them, so I just kept heading up through the bush to come out on the road west of where I had gone down. It did not matter as the bush was all much the same. The distance from the road to the bay is about 1.8 kms. and took me 1'25" for the descent and 2'10' for the ascent.
This was a good walk although I found it reasonably tiring. Probably being 30 or 40 years younger would have made a big difference!!! The scenery at the bay was quite special.
Distance: 14.5 kms.
Time: 6'52"
Ascent 750 metres
Click here for GPX file.






Saturday, 20 January 2018

Lobster Point

Saturday 20th January 2018

Lobster Point
A few friends accompanied me on a walk to Lobster Point on the Tasman Peninsula. I had previously done a similar walk a few years ago but this one had a few variations.
We parked near the toilet block at Sloping Main and set off along the beach. As it was holiday time and also the weekend there were a few people out and about, both in and out of the water. The walk along the beach was easy as the sand was rock hard. The weather was overcast and misty but it brightened up to be another perfect day. It is just on 3.0 kms. to walk the length of the beach.

Sloping Main Beach

Lobster Point

End of Sloping Main Beach

End of Sloping Main Beach

Burdens Marshes
At the end of the beach, we scrambled up to the top of the cliffs and followed the track around to Whalebone Beach.

Whalebone Beach

Whalebone Beach

End of Whalebone Beach
After Whalebone Beach we continued following the coastal track around. We, or should I say I, managed to lose the track on a few occasions, but it did not matter too much as we just made our way through the light scrub and around to Lobster Point.

Lobster Point

Sloping Island

Lobster Point

Lobster Point

Lobster Point
After a snack stop, we walked on to Lagoon Beach. By this time the weather had improved markedly and this emphasized the beautiful turquoise colour of the water.

Lagoon Beach

Lagoon Beach

Lagoon Beach
Lagoon Beach

Cliffs southern end Lagoon Beach
We walked along the beach for a short distance before exiting over to the lagoon, which was dry as usual. We now walked along various tracks/fire trails back to Sloping Main Beach where we found a conveniently place log to sit on for lunch. There was some debate about going for a swim as the water looked so inviting, but in the end all declined.

Heading back to Sloping Main Beach

Sloping Main Beach

Sloping Main Beach

Sloping Main Beach
 From here it was a quick walk back to the car.
This was a delightful walk with some nice coastal scenery.
Distance: 14.6 kms.
Time: 4'31"
Ascent: 160 metres
Click here for GPX file.